How Well Do You Sleep

When I talk to people about their top health concerns and stumbling blocks, poor sleep quality, lack of sleep, or some sort of negative sleep pattern is the top most popular response.

Most people are chronically exhausted because they aren’t getting enough sleep and aren’t getting sufficient quality sleep.  This ties into other habits we have, but the overall conclusion is we don’t place a high enough value on quality sleep.  We let that suffer before other things on our to-do list, and that’s just what it ends up doing… suffering.

So, how’s your sleep?  Do you sleep well, or do you struggle when it comes to sleep?

Luckily, even if you struggle with sleeping well, there are so many tweaks and tricks you can do to improve your sleep quality.  My favorite ways are to journal before bed and to have a routine that I try to follow most nights.

Deep Sleeping Tips

How to Sleep Well Naturally

Statistics show that only about a third of all people are getting at least 7 hours of sleep a night. The quality of sleep, and ultimately the quality of life, of many people, are compromised due to not being well rested. I fully understand busy weeks or months, but if this becomes a trend in your life, it’s something worth taking a look at. So, what should you do to boost the amount of rest you get, naturally and effectively?

Here are a few of my favorite ways to do just that:

1. Turn off the phone
Light tells our brains that it is time to get up and move, and halts melatonin production. Therefore, when you are trying to get some sleep, doing things like regularly checking your phone, watching TV, etc., can prevent you from getting any restful sleep once you do close your eyes. About an hour before bed, turn off your phone, and keep it away from your bed, so you are not tempted to check it at night. Believe me, after the initial uncomfortable feeling of not having your phone nearby, you’ll absolutely love the feeling of being disconnected for a short while.

2. Exercise during the day
Sometimes, the reason why we can’t get any sleep is that we have built up energy. One way to release that is by going for a walk, a long jog around your favorite park, or some cardio activity for 30 minutes to an hour every day. Doing so will cause you to expend that energy, and get to sleep much faster.

3. Use your bed only for sleeping
A lot of people like to use their bed as a kind of workstation. They will do work on their bed, talk to people on the phone while on it, and even eat while on their beds sometimes. This habit can cause your mind to stop associating the bed with sleep, and start associating it with activity. When this happens, it can prevent you from getting restful sleep and can affect your quality of sleep in the long run. So keep your bed as a sacred spot for relaxation and rest, and you’ll be well on your way to a good nights sleep.

4. Develop a routine
When it comes to getting to bed, a lot of people don’t or can’t develop a regular sleep schedule. Not having a schedule you follow can become an issue if you have a flexible work schedule, for instance. When no boundaries are in place, it’s much easier to fall off track. Set some bedtime boundaries and follow them as closely as possible, and you’ll quickly notice what a difference it makes.

Having a good routine and healthy sleeping habits will increase both your quality of sleep and your quality of life in the long run. It is imperative to prevent doing things that can negatively affect your sleep schedule, and work to get your circadian rhythm into balance naturally.

Tips for Getting a Good Night’s Sleep

More and more people just can’t sleep at night, or have trouble staying asleep. In fact, over 30% of the world’s population suffer from insomnia, a sleep disorder.

The result: poor judgment, zombie looks, irritable mood, and a host of serious health problems for those who are always sleep deprived.

But the reality is we try hard to get a good night’s sleep. It’s just easier said than done. So many culprits cause sleeplessness, some are even inevitable.

I hope these tips will help you get a better night’s sleep.

Ban Blue Light in the Bedroom

Avoid Naps

Block the Clock

Try a Leg Pillow

Avoid Coffee After 12

Keep Pets off the Bed

Put Your Neck in Neutral

Reserve Your Bed for Sleep

Set Your Body Clock

Time Exercise Right

Seal Your Mattress

Eat Right at Night

Rethink Your Drink

Stop Sipping After 8 pm

Lower the Lights

Use Sleeping Pills With Caution

Fall Asleep to White Noise

Skip the Smoke

Free Your Mind at Bedtime

Keep Your Room Cool

A lot of small footsteps makes up a long walk.

Think about if you were to sprint instead.

You’d zoom right past everything, missing the details.

You’d end up there out of breath, covered in sweat and ready to collapse.

That’s precisely what happens when we try to marathon our new healthy habits.  We excitedly jump in head first and end up overwhelmed and frozen.  The next time you make promises to yourself for change, I want you to take the stroll route.  Choose one small step you can change and master before you add another small step to your plate.  Before long, you will have integrated each small step into your life in such a natural and effective way, and you’ll reach the finish line happy, healthy and ready for more.

 

Give Your Sleep Habits a Spring Makeover

With the arrival of Spring finally among us, most of us are also dealing with daylight savings time and the change that that brings. The longer days and waking up while it’s still dark outside can take a toll on our sleep cycle. This makes Spring the perfect time to take a good look at your sleeping habits and nighttime routine to see where some tweaks can be made to improve your sleep this Spring and beyond.

So take note: are you getting at least 7 hours of sleep per night? Do you toss and turn or do you sleep peacefully during the night? Do you wake up feeling refreshed in the morning?

Sleep deprivation and sleep problems are incredibly common, so chances are you struggle with at least one of those. Here are a few ways you can overhaul your sleep patterns and habits this spring and beyond:

Implement a calming bedtime routine 30 minutes to an hour before you hop into bed. Try going tech-free at least 30 minutes before bed and see what a difference it makes on calming your mind and how you sleep more peacefully.

Try stretching before bed, even just a few stretches on the floor beside your bed before you settle in for the night. Small stretches to stretch through your muscles and help them relax the stress from the day away. This also enables you to get back in your body and keep your mind from floating around from thought to thought as you try to drift away to sleep.

Aside from ways to help you get to sleep, ideas to help you wake up refreshed are also great to implement right now. Start by looking up some healthy morning tonics or smoothies on Pinterest and finding one that piques your interest. Try that starting this week in the morning and use that as afew minutes to yourself to wake up and start your day. If possible, incorporate some movement for 10-15 minutes to get your blood pumping. This could be a walk around the block, doing a few yoga poses, or something more vigorous, if you’re up to it in the mornings.

The new year brings resolutions to finally go to the gym regularly and to get your health in order.  It’s no surprise to you to hear that the vast majority of those resolutions are dropped by spring (or even late January, early February!) — but why?

I truly believe it is planning.  It’s the exact reason why my exercise routine goes dormant, and it’s probably why yours does too.  It’s tough to change our habits and routines, and most of all, it’s hard to fit one more thing into our schedule.  Don’t you agree?

That’s the thing.  If it’s not on your schedule, it’s not going to get done.  Do you have your exercise, whether it be walking, jogging, yoga, dance, a workout at the gym — is it on your schedule?  Is there a time for it, where you know that time is carved out?

If not, fit it into your schedule this week.  Make it achievable — if you’re slammed at work this week, write in a 15-minute walk on your lunch break.  Don’t give up altogether because you don’t have an hour and a half to hit the gym.  Good luck!

In general, most people know what they need to do to improve their health.  You don’t need a Doctor to tell you to eat more vegetables, not smoke cigarettes and to drink water instead of soda.  This is all common knowledge, and you are wiser than you know.

What is one thing you know you need to do to take a small step forward?  I want you to think in baby steps so that it’s manageable.  For example, if you know you have been too attached to your phone lately, start with something small.

Instead of sitting in bed scrolling social media until you close your eyes at night, start by replacing that scrolling time with something else.  Leave your phone plugged in on your nightstand and read a book instead.  See how that settles with you over a few days, and reevaluate.

So, what is it that you know you need to change, and will begin the process of changing this week?